The Anatomy of Death: Notes from a Healer’s Casebook

The Anatomy of Death: Notes from a Healer’s Casebook

So then, finally, my book has been published on Amazon!  It has easily taken a decade to do this, and the moment is here.Blog_cover  I am thrilled that this has finally come to fulfillment.  The origins of this book began over 30 years ago, at the death of my father.  He chose to die at home, and his ending was horrible.  Here, in the most technologically advanced society that has ever been, that someone had to die like this was beyond me.  I made a promise to him then, that I would find out everything I could about this process, for the betterment of all of us.

So began this search; it led me to graduate school, to work with the dying, to research, and to collate my notes into my dissertation, and then this book.  We are so afraid of this process–we no longer have the ministrations and trappings of religion to guide us.  In some ways this was a good thing, because we are now required to look for those guidelines within ourselves.  But sometimes it’s a bad thing–or at least it causes more anxiety–to not have looked for guidelines as to what happens after death. Because when we then arrive at its door, without preparation, the fear overwhelms us.  There is no need for that.

Can I say with certainty what happens after death?  No.  But do other cultures and belief systems have much to say on the matter?  Yes, they do.  Have I had personal experience in altered states of consciousness with the dying that may help us?  I think so, I hope so, I pray so.  Many still die in abject pain and fear, and their caregivers have no way to help them.  Here, I hope to present one way.  To think about what you believe, and put it into practice.

What we choose to believe is indeed our choice.  We can choose to believe that’s there’s nothing after this, and our energy dissipates to nothing, or we can choose to believe that we go on from here.  Not a single person living can say one belief is better than another.  But I can tell you this, when one does believe that we go on from here, it becomes much easier to accept passing, and to come to terms with the end of life.  Science does not, and cannot answer these questions.  Perhaps it will someday, but not now.  So in the meantime, why not choose what way seems best to you, and allows you to live this moment to its best, and to face what all of us must ultimately accept in humility.

“Dust though art, and to dust, thou shalt return.”

I will add one thing to that; to shed the dusty shell allows one to mount wings and fly.